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Co Tenancy Agenda v2

CLARKSBURG — Hiring is underway for pipeline projects in the state.

Tree felling has already started in West Virginia to make way for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, which will carry natural gas from Harrison County to Robeson County, North Carolina.

Another project, the Mountain Valley Pipeline, expects tree felling to start soon in some locations. This pipeline will run from northwestern West Virginia to Southern Virginia.

“A definitive construction start date has not yet been set,” according to Natalie Cox, Mountain Valley Pipeline spokesperson. “Given the issuance of partial notices to proceed by the (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission) for select areas along the route, it is likely that activity in West Virginia will begin with tree felling.”

BLUEFIELD — Two natural gas pipelines originating in the state could mean economic benefits for all residents, local legislators say.

Both pipelines, Mountain Valley Pipeline (MVP) and Atlantic Coast Pipeline (ACP), will start in the Marcellus Formation shale fields in north central West Virginia.

The MVP is a 303-mile, 42-inch diameter, $3.5 billion line that will end in Chatham, Va. and run through both Monroe and Giles counties. The ACP is 600 miles long and will end in North Carolina.

Although the pipelines have faced stiff opposition from residents in many of the counties impacted, including Monroe and Giles counties, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has given both the green light.

Del. John Shott (R-Mercer County) said the lines will bring opportunities, not only for tax revenue but for other state uses.

Nearly 360,000 West Virginians depend on food stamps to make ends meet — that’s 19.5 percent of the state’s population. For these households, paying for food and necessities like clothing and shelter is already a daily struggle, let alone paying an electricity bill that could have been much lower with the right set of policies.

That’s because keeping the lights on, and their homes warm, takes a bigger bite out of the budget for this these households than it does for the average family.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the bottom fifth of households spent 22 percent of their take-home pay on residential utility bills and gasoline in April 2016. That’s significantly higher than the 6 percent experts say is “affordable.”

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — A federal judge on Friday granted approval for the Mountain Valley Pipeline to move ahead with eminent domain on properties along the project’s path in northern West Virginia counties.

The decision stands to give the pipeline developers access to disputed property even before fair value is assessed.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — An annual report issued by Antero Resources projects that oil and gas production will increase by 20 percent in 2018.

“So we’ll drill, in West Virginia, 120 wells, but in 2012 terms, that’s 250 wells because we’ve developed twice as many minerals by extending the lateral length out twice as much,” Chief Administrative Officer and Treasurer Al Schopp said Wednesday on MetroNews “Talkline.”

Additionally, Schopp said that Antero Resources will pay close to $70 million in taxes this year to the state.

FAIRMONT, W.Va. — Pierpont Community & Technical College is one of four institutions receiving funds from Chevron Appalachia as part of the company’s ongoing commitment to area workforce development.

Since 2014, Chevron has invested more than $2.1 million in ShaleNET programs the region’s community and technical schools, including Pierpont, as well as Westmoreland County Community College and Pennsylvania College of Technology in Pennsylvania, and Stark State Community College in Ohio.

The latest investment, totaling $630,000 in ShaleNET education programs, comes as the energy industry matures and ShaleNET’s curriculum adapts to reflect the region’s need for a highly-skilled workforce. Today’s program model focuses on transferrable skills that enable successful careers across the growing energy and advanced manufacturing industries.

MOUNDSVILLE — China Energy’s potential $84 billion investment in energy projects in the Mountain State has sparked an uptick in interest in available industrial properties throughout the Upper Ohio Valley, officials say.

The memorandum of understanding, or MOU, is not binding, meaning the Chinese company can still back out if it wants to.

“Everybody’s trying to figure out what it means,” said Bryce Custer, NAI spring real estate adviser, Energy Services.

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