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gasfacts2019

Co Tenancy Agenda v2

Major weather events in recent years have demonstrated a growing need for diversifying America’s petrochemical industry.

A year ago this week, Hurricane Harvey hit Texas — and within six days, 27 trillion gallons of rain had fallen on the region. Winds reaching up to 135 mph tore through the nation’s fourth-largest city, devastating Houston and the Gulf Coast.

The West Virginia oil and natural gas industry has been identified by some as a source to fund annual cost increases of $50 million for the Public Employees Insurance Agency.

In a recent commentary, Jay O’Neal, treasurer of the Kanawha County chapter of the West Virginia Education Association, wrote “there is plenty of money available to PEIA without hurting working West Virginians. It’s just a matter of priorities.”

Mr. O’Neal advocates an increase in the natural gas severance tax as a source to fund PEIA, as he believes revenue from the resource will continue to increase. Contrary to Mr. O’Neal’s statement, an increase in the natural gas severance tax would be certain to hurt working West Virginians, as well as the state itself.

CLARKSBURG — Eight energy companies have committed to a plan aimed at reducing the environmental impact of natural gas pipeline construction.

Dominion Energy, Enbridge, EQT Midstream Partners, Kinder Morgan, NiSource, Southern Company Gas, UGI Energy Services and Williams have announced plans to follow the guidelines of new report titled “Improving Steep-Slope Pipeline Construction to Reduce Impacts to Natural Resources.”

PARKERSBURG — A poll of residents living in the Marcellus and Utica shale regions found a positive opinion of the oil and gas industry while the federal agency tasked with their environmental protection had the least trust.

Orion Strategies polled 600 people 18 and older who live along the Ohio River in West Virginia, Ohio and Pennsylvania. The live-interview telephone poll was conducted April 3-6.

  • Nine institutions of higher learning in West Virginia receive funds from 3:1 Educational Matching Gift Program
  • Recipient organizations encouraged to support math and science initiatives

IRVING, Texas – ExxonMobil and its employees, including XTO staff, contributed more than $287,000 to nine institutions of higher education across West Virginia as part of the ExxonMobil Foundation’s 2017 Educational Matching Gift Program.

ExxonMobil and XTO employees, retirees, directors and surviving spouses contributed almost $72,000 to nine West Virginia colleges and universities, which was matched by over $215,000 in unrestricted grants from the ExxonMobil Foundation. Although grants are unrestricted, colleges and universities are encouraged to designate a portion to math and science programs supporting student engagement.

WEST UNION — The MarkWest Sherwood Complex continues to help the residents of Doddridge County in a variety of ways through the site’s work in oil and gas.

MarkWest is a wholly-owned subsidiary of MPLX. The Sherwood Complex first began operations in October 2012, said Jamal Kheiry, communications manager for Marathon Petroleum Corp.

“MPLX’s natural gas processing complexes remove the heavier and more valuable hydrocarbon components from natural gas,” Kheiry said.

In 2017, through a joint venture between MarkWest and Antero Midstream, the company was able to add three more gas processing plants, with the capacity of processing 200 million cubic feet of gas every day. Last year, the company invested $200 million in construction.

“The Sherwood Complex now processes natural gas in nine processing plants, with a total capacity of 1.8 billion cubic feet per day,” Kheiry said. “Sherwood also includes a 40,000 barrel per day de-ethanization unit, which separates ethane from natural gas.”

Hoppy's Commentary | May 16, 2018 at 12:32AM

Two years ago, University of Cincinnati environmental studies professor Dr. Amy Townsend-Small caused a stir when she told a meeting of the Carroll County (Ohio) Concerned Citizens that her research showed fracking was NOT polluting their water.

The announcement was a stunner for opponents of hydraulic fracturing to reach natural gas deposits buried deep below the surface.  A portion of the funding for the study even came from fracking opponents who anticipated they would finally have scientific evidence that fracking contaminated their water wells.

“I am really sad to say this, but some of our funders, the groups that had given us funding in the past, were a little disappointed in our results,” Townsend-Small told those at the meeting.  “They feel that fracking is scary and so they were hoping that this data could be a reason to ban it.”

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